Preventive Failure

According to the institute of Electrical and Electrical Engineers (IEEE), the failure rate is three times higher for systems where preventive maintenance in not performed.

A great deal can go wrong if an electrical distribution system in not adequately maintained. As electrical loads cycle between high and low demand, thermal expansion and contraction can cause connections to loosen. Electrical panels that are never cleaned accumulate dust and dirt that deposit on these connections. The loose and dirty connections provide a high resistance path that is directly responsible for more than 30% of all electrical failures. Another 17% of all electrical failures are attributed to liveĀ  electrical components being exposed to moister.

According to the institute of Electrical and Electrical Engineers (IEEE), the failure rate is three times higher for systems where preventive maintenance in not performed. This tells us that electrical failures for the most part, can be avoided. Therefore preventive maintenance on your main electrical distribution system should be performed immediately if it has never been done. This should be done by a qualified electrical contractor with a thorough understanding and knowledge of electrical safety practices and procedures. In addition, special training in working with high voltages live. It is also imperative that an electronic thermo-graphic inspection of the electrical equipment be conducted using infrared testing equipment to detect overheating, overload, insulation breakdown, and finally fire hazards.

  • Electrical Troubleshooting
  • Preventive & Predictive Maintenance
  • Energized Preventive Maintenance
  • Transformer Maintenance & Testing
  • Infrared & Thermographic Scanning
  • Electrical Equipment Maintained & Tested
  • Emergency Services
  • Switch Gear Maintenance
  • Arc Flash Prevention
Should you be doing electrical preventive maintenance? YOU BET!

Preventive Maintenance is not a new concept. People have been doing precautionary work on motors, engines, and other mechanical systems for decades. But when I mention preventive maintenance on electrical distribution systems, I am often met with incredulous looks and the repeated question, “what for? Nothing moves. What could go wrong?”